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Daughters of the American Revolution remember those that have passed

Daughters of the American Revolution remember those that have past
Posted at 10:41 AM, May 30, 2021
and last updated 2021-05-30 12:42:00-04

HELENA — Every Memorial Day weekend the Oro Fino chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution places 135 American flags at 19 cemeteries.

Rain or shine, the members have been coming out to place those American flags on the headstones of their fallen sisters.

For Jane Hammon, being a part of the organization honors her family history and her country. "I was inspired to join the DAR because of the stories my grandmother told me when I was a little girl about, us having patriots being involved in the American Revolution," she said.

Every Memorial Day weekend the Oro Fino chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution places 135 American flags at 19 cemeteries.

To join the DAR, a member must prove that their grandfather served as a patriot in the American Revolutionary War.

The organization also prides itself on public service and civic leadership. Past members like Helen Mcintire have contributed to making Helena a better place.

"Helen and Henry were well known in circles in Helena because of his active role as an attorney in the city and her active work in numerous charities, including St. Peter's Cathedral and St. Peter's hospital," said Hammon.

Betty Babcock was also a member of the organization and a former First Lady of Montana. Hammon, who personally knew Babcock, says they both shared the value of joining DAR.
"Loved the DAR, because you are supporting patriotism, our soldiers, and educating our children, and those are the things that make for a wonderful society," Hammon said.

Every Memorial Day weekend the Oro Fino chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution places 135 American flags at 19 cemeteries.

On most headstones, members can add a spinning wheel which is the organization's logo. The thirteen spokes look like stars and represent the 13 colonies. The spinning wheel also has a deep meaning.

"One of the most important contributions that the women could make was spinning and making goods and clothing because the more they made the less was imported from Great Britain and that meant they were hurting the economy of Great Britain and contributing the war effort at the same time," said Hammon.

To learn more about the organization, visit their website.