Ed's Almanac

Sep 17, 2012 12:59 PM by Ed McIntosh Q2 Weather Center

Ed's Almanac: String of dry days is adding up.

Here are some interesting statistics on our on-going dry spell from Joe Lester, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service office in Billings:

The Billings Airport has not received measurable precipitation since August 15th. That's a stretch of 32 consecutive days as of Sunday September 16th. This ranks as 8th longest since records began in 1934. A dry weather pattern is shaping up for the entire week, with virtually no chance of precipitation through at least Sunday, August 23rd, so the current stretch of dry days will rise in the rankings over the coming days.

Here are the top 10 most consecutive days without measurable precipitation at Billings. The date listed is the beginning of the stretch. Measurable precipitation is defined as 0.01 inches or more. Thus, a trace is not measurable.

Billings

1. 62 06/26/2003
2. 51 10/30/1939
3. 46 12/08/1954
4. 45 10/17/1934
5. 42 10/26/1954
6. 40 12/05/2002
7. 33 07/26/1996
8. 32 08/16/2012
9. 32 09/11/1952
10. 31 06/28/1964

The dry streak at Sheridan, Wyoming is even more remarkable. The Sheridan airport has not received measurable precipitation since August 10th, That's a stretch of 37 consecutive days as of Sunday, September 16th. This ranks as 2nd longest since records began in 1907. The record is 46 days...and given the dry week expected...Sheridan will get close to the record and may break it next week. Here are the top 10 most consecutive days without measurable precipitation at Sheridan.

Sheridan

1. 46 12/05/2002
2. 37 08/11/2012
3. 34 07/29/1925
4. 34 10/21/1908
5. 33 08/08/1988
6. 33 09/08/1943
7. 33 10/29/1939
8. 32 07/31/1970
9. 31 10/15/1952
10. 30 01/08/2004

In addition to Joe's statistics, there is one more number to throw in for Billings. This could be the driest September on record. You might remember September, 2011 was very dry at only 0.12 inches of precipitation. That was the 3rd lowest. With only a trace of precipitation so far in September, 2012, we could beat the all-time record of 0.06 inches of precipitation set in 1963.

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